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The Picky Reader

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Editor: Chris Manganaro

(photo credits: www.leziosa.com)

copyright Art of Living, PrimaMedia,Inc/Maria Liberati

Do you like Brussels sprouts? It would seem that a large number of people are averse to these green veggies, but they are not the only vegetables that have a ‘bad reputation’. Of course, vegetables are not the only things that people may not like. Practically every food has its detractors. Why people dislike certain foods often varies. Some people don’t like the look of liver or the smell of broccoli. Everyone has something they dislike, but some people have more trouble than others. These people have been dubbed picky eaters.

While it may seem straight-forward to the picky person themselves why they hate parsnips, there is still a curiosity about the underlying cause among many. Stephanie V. W. Lucianovic, having been a picky eater herself, is so fascinated by the idea that she wrote a book about it. Her book, entitled Suffering Succotash: A Picky Eater’s Quest to Understand Why We Hate the Foods We Hate, looks into the many different sides of picky eating from causes to supposed solutions. Having been a picky eater, she understands what it can do to a person and the people around them.

Lucianovic approaches the subject in each chapter from a different viewpoint. There is an underlying chronological series of events throughout the book, but it is set up in such a way that the author’s story goes along with the research rather than vice versa. This makes the book seem as if it would be a bit heavy on the science, but actually Lucianovic’s writing style keeps things fresh by constantly adding anecdotes and witty lines that keep the science from getting stale. Even though there are footnotes, they are more often there to add a smile rather than just more information. It also helps that the subject changes so frequently. In one chapter she talks about dealing with picky eating children while another is about how emotion can affect our feelings towards food.

Not only does she concentrate on the scientific side of things, but she also tries to give advice to those who may need it. There are even a few recipes which she adds in hope of helping people overcome their pickiness. While at times the advice may be useful, she also approaches these asides with a sense of humor. By adding little jokes and references throughout, she keeps the book light so it never sits too heavy in the stomach of the reader. She comes off very likable because she doesn’t take herself too seriously.

As a foodie, Lucianovic describes food in wonderful ways. If she is describing a disliked food it can sound revolting yet at the same time she can make your mouth water. It is fascinating that being a foodie and a picky eater can go hand-in-hand. Observations like these really make you think.

Picky eaters have to deal with more than their fair share of trouble, but aren’t we all picky eaters to some extent? How can we really ridicule people for their likes and dislikes when it just varies depending on who we are? While the picky reader may not like this book, the picky eater is sure to enjoy the taste of it.

Hope to see you at

*October 7th-Williams Sonoma Columbus Circle, NY,NY

*October 12-14-Taste of Philadelphia Show at oaks Convention Center, Oaks Pa

*October 18th-Foodie Event and Fundraiser- Quakertown, Pa for details go to www.ubcc.org

For great recipes get your copy of The Basic Art of Italian Cooking: Holidays & Special Occasions-2nd edition

cover- book 2nd edition-001

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Designed by Brian Hanshaw

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